In subjects with early cataracts, average progression of density
over 6 months was 15% lower with Lenstatin vs placebo*

Read the Lenstatin vs placebo study here »

See Clearly: The Lenstatin Advantage

Lenstatin contains 11 antioxidants carefully selected for anti-cataract properties observed in laboratory settings and formulated in a unique proprietary quantity to maximize effect.



Proprietary Anti-Oxidant Blend

The Lenstatin™ Proprietary Antioxidant Blend contains four antioxidants in a specific quantitative ratio which is not reproduced by any other nutritional supplement. Click the plus signs below to expand on each ingredient.

Per serving (2 capsules)

Proprietary Anti-Oxidant Blend, 220mg total:
  • Phycocyanin
  • Alpha Lipoic Acid
  • Glutathione
  • Pyruvate

  • Lutein 5mg
  • Zeaxanthin 2mg
  • Astaxanthin 2mg
  • Silybin 10mg
  • Turmeric 25mg
  • Quercitin 40 mg
  • Riboflavin 3mg
Phycocyanin - blue-green biliprotein Spirulina Algae Extract with antioxidant properties
Phycocyanin may suppress D-galactose-induced human lens epithelial cell apoptosis through mitochondrial and unfolded protein response pathways.

Source

School of Life Science and Technology, China Pharmaceutical University, Nanjing, China.

Abstract

Apoptosis of lens epithelial cell (LEC) plays an important role in cataract formation, and its prevention may be one of the therapeutic strategies in treating cataract. This study used human lens epithelial cell (hLEC) line SRA01/04 to investigate the protective effect and mechanism of phycocyanin on glactose-induced apoptosis in hLEC. hLECs were cultured in D/F(12)-10% FBS medium containing 125mM d-galactose with or without phycocyanin. These results suggest that phycocyanin might suppress d-galactose-induced hLEC apoptosis through two pathways: mitochondrial pathway, involving p53 and Bcl-2 family protein expression, and unfolded protein response pathway, involving GRP78 and CHOP expression.
C-phycocyanin modulates selenite-induced cataractogenesis in rats.

Source

Department of Marine Biotechnology, Bharathidasan University, Tiruchirappalli 24, Tamil Nadu, India.

Abstract

The present investigation is aimed to evaluate the anticataractogenic potential of C-phycocyanin (C-PC), extracted and purified from Spirulina platensis. Enucleated rat lenses were maintained in vitro in Dulbecco's modified Eagle medium (DMEM). Group I contained DMEM, Group II and Group III contained 100 μM of sodium selenite, Group III was subdivided into three viz IIIa, IIIb, IIIc supplemented with 100, 150, 200 μg of C-PC respectively. In the in vivo study, on tenth day post partum: Group I rat pups received an intraperitoneal injection of saline, Group II, IIIa, IIIb, and IIIc rat pups received a subcutaneous injection of sodium selenite (19 μmol/kg bodyweight) Group IIIa, IIIb, IIIc also received an intraperitoneal injection of 100, 150, 200 mg/kg body weight of C-PC, respectively, from postpartum days 9-14. On termination of the experiment, the lenses from both in vitro and in vivo studies were subjected to morphological examination and subsequently processed to estimate the activities of antioxidant enzymes namely superoxide dismutase, catalase, glutathione peroxidase, glutathione reductase, levels of reduced glutathione and lipid peroxidation products. Sodium selenite-exposed, C-PC-treated rat lenses (Group IIIc), showed significant restoration of antioxidant enzyme activity (p < 0.05) when compared to their counterpart Group II. Group IIIc conserved the levels of GSH and lipid peroxidation products at near to normal levels as compared with Group II.

Results conclude the possible role of C-PC in modulating the antioxidant enzyme status, thereby retarding sodium selenite-induced cataract incidence both in vitro and in vivo.
Alpha Lipoic Acid - a fat and water-soluble organosulfur antioxidant
Cataract development in diabetic sand rats treated with alpha-lipoic acid and its gamma-linolenic acid conjugate

Source

Faculty of Agricultural, Food and Environmental Quality Sciences, The Hebrew University of Jerusalem, Israel.

Background

Diabetes commonly leads to long-term complications such as cataract. This study investigated the effects of alpha-lipoic acid (LPA) and its gamma-linolenic acid (GLA) conjugate on cataract development in diabetic sand rats.

Results

LPA injection significantly inhibited cataract development and reduced blood glucose levels in rats fed the "high-energy" diet. Lens AR activity tended to be lower, while lenticular GSH levels increased. In sand rats fed a "medium-energy" diet (59% starch), LPA intubation had no effect on blood glucose levels and cataract development but GSH levels were increased. In contrast, sand rats intubated with GLA conjugate showed the highest blood glucose levels and accelerated cataract development. The conjugate treatment also decreased lenticular GSH content
Efficacy of alpha-lipoic acid against diabetic cataract in rat

Source

Department of Ophthalmology, Kanazawa Medical University, Ishikawa, Japan

Abstract

Alpha-Lipoic acid (LA) is well known as a powerful antioxidant. The efficacy of dihydrolipoate-LA for oral administration against streptozotocin (STZ)-induced diabetic cataract in rat was investigated.

Conclusion

LA treatment delayed development and progression of cataract in rats with streptozotocin-induced diabetes
Alpha-lipoic acid prevents buthionine sulfoximine-induced cataract formation in newborn rats

Source

Department of Molecular and Cell Biology, University of California, Berkeley

Abstract

We investigated the effect of alpha-lipoic acid, a powerful antioxidant, on cataract formation in L-buthionine(S,R)-sulfoximine (BSO)-treated newborn rats and found that a dose of 25 mg/kg b.w. protected 60% of animals from cataract formation.

L-buthionine(S,R)-sulfoximine is an inhibitor of glutathione synthesis, whose administration to newborn animals leads to the development of cataracts; this is a potential model for studying the role of therapeutic antioxidants in protecting animals from cataract formation. Major biochemical changes in the lens associated with the protective effect of alpha-lipoic acid were increases in glutathione, ascorbate, and vitamin E levels, loss of which are effects of BSO administration. Treatment with alpha-lipoic acid also restored the activities of glutathione peroxidase, catalase, and ascorbate free radical reductase in lenses of L-buthionine(S,R)-sulfoximine-treated animals but did not affect glutathione reductase or superoxide dismutase activity. We conclude that alpha-lipoic acid may take over some of the functions of glutathione (e.g., maintaining the higher level of ascorbate, indirect participation in vitamin E recycling); the increase of glutathione level in lens tissue mediated by lipoate could be also due to a direct protection of protein thiols.

Thus, alpha-lipoic acid could be of potential therapeutic use in preventing cataracts and their complications.
Glutathione - intracellular tripeptide with antioxidant properties essential to cell function
Prevention of acetaminophen- and naphthalene-induced cataract and glutathione loss by CySSME

Source

Department of Ophthalmology, University of Minnesota, Minneapolis, MN

Purposes

To assess the efficacy of 2-mercaptoethanol/L-cysteine mixed disulfide (CySSME) as an L-cysteine prodrug suitable for glutathione biosynthesis in rat lenses in vitro, as an agent for the prevention of acetaminophen- and naphthalene-induced murine cataract in genetically-susceptible mice, and as an agent for maintenance of near-normal glutathione levels in lenses and livers of mice subjected to acetaminophen and naphthalene at cataractogenic doses.

Results

CySSME served as an effective L-cysteine precursor for glutathione biosynthesis in cultured rat lenses. This L-Cysteine prodrug was also highly effective in preventing acetaminophen- and naphthalene-induced cataract in mice and in maintaining near-normal glutathione levels in lenses and livers of such treated animals.

Conclusion

This investigation demonstrates that maintenance of adequate physiological levels of glutathione in the presence of specific known cataractogenic agents by pharmacologic intervention with CySSME, an L-cysteine prodrug, is sufficient to prevent cataract formation.
In vivo inhibition of l-buthionine-(S,R)-sulfoximine-induced cataracts by a novel antioxidant, N-acetylcysteine amide

Source

Department of Chemistry, Missouri University of Science & Technology, Rolla, MO

Abstract

The effects of N-acetylcysteine amide (NACA), a free radical scavenger, on cataract development were evaluated in Wistar rat pups. Cataract formation was induced in these animals with an intraperitoneal injection of a glutathione (GSH) synthesis inhibitor, l-buthionine-(S,R)-sulfoximine (BSO).

Our findings indicate that N-acetycysteine (NACA) inhibits cataract formation by limiting protein carbonylation, lipid peroxidation, and redox system components, as well as replenishing antioxidant enzymes.
Prevention of selenite-induced cataractogenesis by N-acetylcysteine in rats

Source

Ophthalmology Department, Fatih University School of Medicine, Ankara, Turkey.

Purpose

To evaluate the effect of N-acetylcysteine on selenite-induced cataract formation in a rat model.

Results

In group 1, 50% of the rats developed dense nuclear opacities and 50% developed slight nuclear opacities, while in group 2 only 14.3% developed dense nuclear opacities and 21.4% developed slight nuclear opacities (p < 0.05). None of the rats in group 3 developed any lens opacity. In lenticular samples, mean glutathione level was statistically lower in group 1 compared to groups 2 and 3 (p < 0.05), while malondialdehyde and protein carbonyl levels were both statistically higher in group 1 compared to groups 2 and 3 (p < 0.05). Serum level of glutathione was statistically lower in group 1 compared to groups 2 and 3 (p < 0.05), while serum malondialdehyde level was statistically lower in group 3 compared to groups 1 and 2.

Conclusion

N-acetylcysteine appears to inhibit selenite-induced cataractogenesis in the rat model, and this seems to be caused by the prevention of oxidative damage.
Prevention of naphthalene-induced cataract and hepatic glutathione loss by the L-cysteine prodrugs, MTCA and PTCA

Source

Department of Ophthalmology, University of Minnesota, Minneapolis, MN 55455

Abstract

Rapid-onset cataracts were induced in SPF C57 bl/6 mice by intraperitoneal administration of naphthalene following cytochrome P-450 isozyme induction with phenobarbital. Several L-cysteine prodrugs with masked sulfhydryl groups in the form of thiazolidine-4-carboxylic acids, as well as N-acetyl-L-cysteine, N,S-bis-acetyl-L-cysteine and glutathione ethyl ester, were evaluated for their ability to maintain hepatic and lenticular glutathione at near-normal levels and to prevent naphthalene-induced cataract formation. Each prodrug was administered at three specified times to a cumulative total of 1.5 mole equivalents of the single dose of naphthalene. Three L-cysteine prodrugs delayed but did not prevent cataract formation in 40-60% of the mice over a 72-hr period, while eight of the 13 compounds produced cataract yields similar to the naphthalene control animals, i.e. 83% in 72 hr. However, two L-cysteine prodrugs, 2(R,S)-methylthiazolidine-4(R)-carboxylic acid (MTCA) and 2(R,S)-n-propylthiazolidine-4(R)-carboxylic acid (PTCA), prevented cataract formation in 20 of 21 and 12 of 12 mice, respectively, and maintained hepatic reduced glutathione levels at 82% and 51% of untreated controls. In contrast, glutathione was depressed to 3% of the normal value in those animals treated with naphthalene alone. Lenticular glutathione values were depressed, albeit minimally, in all naphthalene-treated mice regardless of administration of either MTCA or PTCA. The mice protected with either MTCA or PTCA showed no visible effects of naphthalene toxicity or lens opacities at any time.

It can be concluded that these L-cysteine prodrugs were effective in preventing naphthalene-induced cataract and maintaining near-normal hepatic glutathione levels.
Pyruvate - intracellular organic acid with antioxidant properties
Induction of Ultraviolet Cataracts In Vitro: Prevention by Pyruvate

Source

The Journal of Ocular Pharmacology & Therapeutics October 2007

Abstract

Ultraviolet (UV) radiation is one of the important cataract risk factors. The present studies examined the hypothesis that this effect is due to the UV penetration through the cornea and subsequent induction of a photochemical generation of reactive species of oxygen (ROS) in the aqueous and lens.

Results

The incorporation of pyruvate in the medium protected the lens against these deleterious effects. That the beneficial effect of pyruvate is attributable to its ROS-scavenging property was proven by the peroxide depletion in its presence, commensurate with its own utilization in parallel. A protective effect of this keto acid against UV-induced tissue damage has been shown for the first time, suggesting its clinical usefulness against UV irradiation induced pathologies. Hence, further studies on the possible protective effects of such a-keto acids against UV damage are in progress.
Morphogenetic And Apoptotic Changes In Diabetic Cataract: Prevention By Pyruvate

Source

Departments of Ophthalmology and Biochemistry, University of Maryland School of Medicine, Baltimore, MD, USA

Abstract

Studies have been conducted to ascertain the preventive effect of pyruvate against diabetes induced damage to DNA and associated morphogenetic changes in the mouse lens. Such changes were characterized by DNA nicks as well as by gross morphological changes in the nuclei, evident respectively by TUNEL and Hoechst staining procedures. Morphogenetic changes were also apparent by abnormal differentiation of the germinal epithelial cells and errors in their migratory pathway. These changes were prevented by simultaneous administration of pyruvate to the diabetic animals. The preventive effect of this agent is attributable to its property of scavenging oxy-radicals generated by high levels of the sugars.

The Lenstatin™ formula is not reproduced by total body, general ocular health, or Macular Degeneration nutritional supplements. Click the plus signs below to expand on each ingredient.

Lutein/ Zeaxanthin - carotenoid antioxidants found in green leafy vegetables
A prospective study of carotenoid and vitamin A intakes and risk of cataract extraction in US women

From the Department of Biostatistics and Epidemiology, School of Public Health and Health Sciences, University of Massachusetts, Amherst; the Channing Laboratory, Brigham and Women's Hospital and Harvard Medical School, Boston; the Departments of Epidemiology, Nutrition, and Biostatistics, Harvard School of Public Health, Boston; and Department of Ophthalmology, Harvard Medical School, Boston, and Massachusetts Eye and Ear Infirmary.

..Background

Oxidation of lens proteins plays a central role in the formation of age-related cataracts, suggesting that dietary antioxidants may play a role in prevention. However, the relation between specific antioxidants and risk of cataract remains uncertain.

..Objective

Our objective was to examine prospectively the association between carotenoid and vitamin A intakes and cataract extraction in women.

Methods

A prospective cohort of registered female nurses aged 45–71 y and free of diagnosed cancer was followed; in 1980, 50461 were included and others were added as they became 45 y of age for a total of 77466. Information on nutrient intake was assessed by repeated administration of a food-frequency questionnaire during 12 y of follow-up.

..Results

During 761762 person-years of follow-up, 1471 cataracts were extracted. After age, smoking, and other potential cataract risk factors were controlled for, those with the highest intake of lutein and zeaxanthin had a 22% decreased risk of cataract extraction compared with those in the lowest quintile.

Conclusions

Lutein and Zeaxanthin and foods rich in these carotenoids may decrease the risk of cataracts severe enough to require extraction.
A prospective study of carotenoid intake and risk of cataract extraction in US men

Source

From the Departments of Epidemiology, Nutrition, and Biostatistics, Harvard School of Public Health, Boston; the Channing Laboratory, Brigham and Women's Hospital and Harvard Medical School, Boston; the Department of Ophthalmology, Harvard Medical School and Massachusetts Eye and Ear Infirmary, Boston; and the Department of Biostatistics and Epidemiology, School of Public Health and Health Sciences, University of Massachusetts, Amherst.

Background

Dietary antioxidants, including carotenoids, are hypothesized to decrease the risk of age-related cataracts by preventing oxidation of proteins or lipids within the lens. However, prospective epidemiologic data concerning this phenomenon are limited.

Objective

Our objective was to examine prospectively the association between carotenoid and vitamin A intakes and cataract extraction in men.

Design

US male health professionals (n = 36644) who were 45–75 y of age in 1986 were included in this prospective cohort study. Others were subsequently included as they became 45 y of age. A detailed dietary questionnaire was used to assess intake of carotenoids and other nutrients. During 8 y of follow-up, 840 cases of senile cataract extraction were documented.

Results

We observed a modestly lower risk of cataract extraction in men with higher intakes of lutein and zeaxanthin but not of other carotenoids (α-carotene, β-carotene, lycopene, and β-cryptoxanthin) or vitamin A after other potential risk factors, including age and smoking, were controlled for. Men in the highest fifth of lutein and zeaxanthin intake had a 19% lower risk of cataract relative to men in the lowest fifth.

Conclusions

Lutein and zeaxanthin may decrease the risk of cataracts severe enough to require extraction, although this relation appears modest in magnitude. The present findings add support for recommendations to consume vegetables and fruit high in carotenoids daily.
Plasma lutein and zeaxanthin and the risk of age-related nuclear cataract among the elderly Finnish population

Source

Department of Medicine, Institute of Public Health and Clinical Nutrition, University of Eastern Finland, Kuopio, Finland.

Abstract

Oxidative stress plays an important role in cataractogenesis. Previous studies have shown that long-term dietary intake of antioxidants (lutein and zeaxanthin) may decrease the risk of age-related cataracts. The aim of the present study was to examine whether plasma concentrations of lutein and zeaxanthin are related to age-related nuclear cataract in the elderly population. The association of plasma lutein and zeaxanthin concentrations with age-related nuclear cataract in 1689 elderly subjects (aged 61-80 years) was investigated in the present cross-sectional study by using the Cox proportional hazards model. A total of 113 cases of incident age-related cataracts were confirmed, of which 108 cases were nuclear cataracts. After adjustment for age, examination year, sex, BMI, smoking, alcohol consumption, serum LDL-cholesterol, serum HDL-cholesterol, years of education, use of oral corticosteroids, history of diabetes and history of hypertension with current use of antihypertensive medication, subjects in the highest tertiles of plasma concentrations of lutein and zeaxanthin had 42 and 41 % lower risks of nuclear cataract, respectively, compared with those in the lowest tertiles.

In conclusion, we suggest that high plasma concentrations of lutein and zeaxanthin were associated with a decreased risk of age-related nuclear cataract in the elderly population.
Associations between age-related nuclear cataract and lutein and zeaxanthin in the diet and serum in the Carotenoids in the Age-Related Eye Disease Study, an Ancillary Study of the Women's Health Initiative

Source

Department of Ophthalmology and Visual Sciences, University of Wisconsin, Madison, WI

Design

A total of 1802 women aged 50 to 79 years in Iowa, Wisconsin, and Oregon with intakes of lutein and zeaxanthin above the 78th (high) and below the 28th (low) percentiles in the Women's Health Initiative Observational Study (1994-1998) were recruited 4 to 7 years later (2001-2004) into the Carotenoids in Age-Related Eye Disease Study.

Results

Women in the group with high dietary levels of lutein and zeaxanthin had a 23% lower prevalence of nuclear cataract (age-adjusted odds ratio, 0.77; 95% confidence interval, 0.62-0.96) compared with those with low levels. Women in the highest quintile category of diet or serum levels of lutein and zeaxanthin as compared with those in the lowest quintile category were 32% less likely to have nuclear cataract .

Conclusions

Diets rich in lutein and zeaxanthin are moderately associated with decreased prevalence of nuclear cataract in older women.
Long-term nutrient intake and early age-related nuclear lens opacities

Source

Laboratory for Nutrition and Vision, Jean Mayer US Department of Agriculture Human Nutrition Research Center on Aging, Tufts University

Objective

To assess the relation between usual nutrient intake and subsequently diagnosed age-related nuclear lens opacities.

Subjects

Four hundred seventy-eight nondiabetic women aged 53 to 73 years from the Boston, Mass, area without previously diagnosed cataracts sampled from the Nurses' Health Study cohort.

Results

The prevalence of nuclear opacification was significantly lower in the highest nutrient intake quintile category relative to the lowest quintile category for vitamin C (P<.001), vitamin E (P =.02), riboflavin (P =.005), folate (P =.009), beta-carotene (P =.04), and lutein/zeaxanthin (P =.03).

Conclusion

These results provide additional evidence that antioxidant nutrients play a role in the prevention of age-related nuclear lens opacities.
Astaxanthin - carotenoid antioxidant found in seafoods
Astaxanthin protects against oxidative stress and calcium-induced porcine lens protein degradation

Source

Department of Clinical Pharmacy, School of Pharmacy, Taipei Medical University, Taipei

Abstract

Astaxanthin (ASTX), a carotenoid with potent antioxidant properties, exists naturally in various plants, algae, and seafoods. In this study, we investigated the in vitro ability of ASTX to protect porcine lens crystallins from oxidative damage by iron-mediated hydroxyl radicals or by calcium ion-activated protease (calpain), in addition to the possible underlying biochemical mechanisms. ASTX (1 mM) was capable of protecting lens crystallins from being oxidized, as measured by changes in tryptophan fluorescence, in the presence of a Fenton reaction solution containing 0.2 mM Fe2+ and 2 mM H2O2. Sodium dodecyl sulfate-polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis analysis demonstrated that beta(high)-crystallin was the most vulnerable protein under these conditions of free radical exposure. The proteolysis of lens crystallins induced by calcium ion-activated calpain was also inhibited by ASTX (0.03-1 mM) as determined by daily measurement of the light-scattering intensity at 405 nm for five consecutive days. ASTX at 1 mM was as potent as a concentration of 0.1 mM calpain inhibitor E64 in protecting the oxidative damage/hydrolysis of porcine crystallins. At a concentration of 1 mM, ASTX provided better protection than the endogenous antioxidant glutathione in terms of suppressing calcium-induced turbidity of lens proteins. Thin-layer chromatography analysis indicated that ASTX interacted with calcium ions to form complexes, which we believe interfere with the hydrolysis of lens crystallins by calcium-activated calpain. This in vitro study shows that ASTX is capable of protecting porcine lens proteins from oxidative insults and degradation by calcium-induced calpain.
Riboflavin - an essential B vitamin with antioxidant properties
Diet and cataract: the Blue Mountains Eye Study

Source

Department of Public Health and Community Medicine, University of Sydney, Australia.

Results

Higher intakes of protein, vitamin A, niacin, thiamin, and riboflavin were associated with reduced prevalence of nuclear cataract. After adjusting for multiple known cataract risk factors, the odds ratios for those in the highest intake quintile groups compared to those in the lowest intake quintiles were 0.5 (95% confidence interval [CI], 0.3-0.8) for protein, 0.5 (95% CI, 0.3-0.9) for vitamin A, 0.6 (95% CI, 0.4-0.9) for niacin, 0.6 (95% CI, 0.4-0.9) for thiamin, and 0.5 (95% CI, 0.3-0.9) for riboflavin. Intake of polyunsaturated fats was associated with reduced prevalence of cortical cataract. No nutrients were associated with posterior subcapsular cataract.

Conclusions

The nucleus of the lens is particularly sensitive to nutrient deficiencies. Protein, vitamin A, niacin, thiamin, and riboflavin protected against nuclear cataract in this study.
Quercetin - flavonoid antioxidant found in found in fruits, vegetables, leaves and grains
Responses of Human Lens Epithelial Cells to Quercetin and DMSO

Source

Department of Ophthalmology, People’s Hospital of Peking University, Beijing, Peoples Republic of China

Purpose

Oxidative stress is an initiating factor in the development of maturity-onset cataract. Diet has a significant impact on cataract development, and individual dietary components responsible for the protective effect include flavonoids, of which quercetin is the most important. The purpose of this study was to investigate the protective effect of quercetin and its toxicity for human lens epithelial cells (HLECs).

Results

DMSO (1% vol/vol) decreased cell viability, increased cellular apoptosis, and upregulated Bax in these cells; 0.1 μM quercetin inhibited these effects and protected HLECs from the toxicity of DMSO. Higher concentrations of quercetin the viability of HLECs decreased. In a dose-dependent response to quercetin, cellular apoptosis increased and the change correlated with upregulation of Bax and decreased cell viability.

Conclusions

Quercetin, at a low concentration (0.1 μM), protects HLECs and reverses the toxic effects of DMSO (1% vol/vol). However, at higher concentrations, quercetin is toxic to HLECs with an LD50 of 90.85 μM. Quercetin induced apoptosis and upregulates apoptotic genes in HLECs in a dose-dependent manner.
Defensive role of quercetin against imbalances of calcium, sodium, and potassium in galactosemic cataract

Source

Physiology Division, Department of Zoology, University College of Science, Osmania University, Hyderabad 500 007, India.

Abstract

Galactosemic cataracts are characterized by electrolyte disturbances resulting in osmotic imbalance and loss of transparency. We have studied the defensive role of quercetin, a bioflavonoid, against the alterations of calcium (Ca2+), sodium (Na+), and potassium (K+) concentrations in galactose-induced cataract in a rodent model. The experimental study was conducted on weanling male Wistar rats with an average body weight of 34 +/- 0.9 g. Different groups received normal stock AIN 93 diet (group A, n = 8), AIN 93 diet with 30% galactose (group B, n = 8), and AIN 93 diet with 30% galactose + quercetin at 400 mg/100 g diet (group C, n = 8). Aldose reductase activity and protein content and concentrations of Ca2+, Na+, and K+ were determined in normal and cataractous lenses. Treatment with quercetin resulted in a significant decrease in Na+ and Ca2+ and aldose reductase levels and an increase in K+ and protein levels in galactosemic cataractous lenses. These results imply that inclusion of quercetin contributes to lens transparency through the maintenance of characteristic osmotic ion equilibrium and protein levels of the lens.
Silybin - Milk Thistle Extract extract with free radical scavenging properties
Cataract: A major secondary complication of diabetes, its epidemiology and an overview on major medicinal plants screened for anticataract activity

Source

Pharmacognosy Research Laboratory, Department of Pharmaceutics, Institute of Technology, Banaras Hindu University, Varanasi-221005, India

Results

Effect of Silybin marianum seed extract at 200 mg/ Kg PO for 40 days was tested against galactose-inducedcataract in rats. The result indicated that, all the stages of cataract development were significantly delayed in silymarin treated group compared to control group. The rats treated with silymarin showed significant increased glutathione and decreased lipid peroxides level compared to control group.
The effect of Silybin marianum (L.) Gaertn. seed extract (silymarin) on galactose induced cataract formation in rats

Authors

Huseini, H. F.; Mahmodabady, A. Z.; Heshmat, R.; Raza, M.

Background

Increased oxygen free radical and reduced glutathione level in the eye lens are important risk factor for cataract formation. The antioxidative property and increasing cellular and extra cellular glutathione level have been reported by several herbal medicines including silymarin.

Objective

In present interventional study Silybin marianum L. seed extract (silymarin) was tested against galactose-induced cataract development in rats. Methods: Thirty male 45 days old wistar rats (150-200 g), were divided in three groups of 10 rats each. Cataract was induced in two groups of rats following feeding them with 30% galactose diet for 40 days. One group kept as control and silymarin in the dose of 200 mg/kg/d was administered orally (mixed with galactose diet) to other group for 40 days. Cataract development in the rats lens was observed daily by ophthalmoscope and naked eye during the study. The glutathione (GSH) and lipid peroxides (LPO) levels were determined after 20 days in all rats left eye lens.

Result

The results indicated that, in silymarin treated group all stage of cataract development were significantly delayed as compared to control group. In rats treated with silymarin the lens GSH level was increased significantly (p<0.01) and LPO levels was decreased significantly as compared to control group (p<0.05).

Conclusion

Administration of silymarin to galactose fed rats showed beneficial effect on prevention of cataract development as well as antioxidative defence system such as increase in lens GSH and decrease LPO levels.
Curcumin - antioxidant extract from Turmeric root
Curcumin and turmeric delay streptozotocin-induced diabetic cataract in rats

Source

National Institute of Nutrition (ICMR), Hyderabad, India.

Purpose

The purpose of this study was to investigate the effect of curcumin and its source, turmeric, on streptozotocin-induced diabetic cataract in rats.

Results

Although, both curcumin and turmeric did not prevent streptozotocin-induced hyperglycemia, as assessed by blood glucose and insulin levels, slit lamp microscope observations indicated that these supplements delayed the progression and maturation of cataract. The present studies suggest that curcumin and turmeric treatment appear to have countered the hyperglycemia-induced oxidative stress, because there was a reversal of changes with respect to lipid peroxidation, reduced glutathione, protein carbonyl content and activities of antioxidant enzymes in a significant manner. Also, treatment with turmeric or curcumin appears to have minimized osmotic stress, as assessed by polyol pathway enzymes. Most important, aggregation and insolubilization of lens proteins due to hyperglycemia was prevented by turmeric and curcumin. Turmeric was more effective than its corresponding levels of curcumin.

Conclusions

The results indicate that turmeric and curcumin are effective against the development of diabetic cataract in rats. Further, these results imply that ingredients in the study's dietary sources, such as turmeric, may be explored for anticataractogenic agents that prevent or delay the development of cataract.

In reviewing the our supplement facts, the appended scientific literature, and comparing Lenstatin™ to other ocular nutritional supplements you will find, “Lenstatin™ is the Premier Cataract & Crystalline Lens Micronutrient Protection Formula”

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